2017 Honda Pilot Review, Specs, Price and Release Date

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The 2017 Honda Pilot can be a capable, refined crossover SUV because of the goodness of the minivan, save for the sliding doors.

The Honda Pilot was the first big crossovers absolutely shun the actual SUV idiom. No blocky, bluff styling, no truck-like frame, no rugged low-ratio transfer case or knobby off-road tires. The very first Pilot had slim roof pillars, a cushy Civic-like cabin, and several seats.

That Pilot was obviously a big hit, and its particular follow-up act sold well, too, despite a bricklike body that made an effort to ape its domestic kin, the Ford Explorer in particular.

Now the third-generation Pilot is to use second year, this is a flip back in Honda’s winning form.

2017 Honda Pilot

2017 Honda Pilot Wallpaper

Available in LX, EX, EX-L, Touring, and Elite trims, the 2017 Honda Pilot has only made minor changes versus its complete redesign last year.

We perform a 7.5 outside of 10, so that it is one of our highest-rated family vehicles.

Honda Pilot styling and gratification

The Pilot’s soft corners and rounded fenders tend to be more appealing as opposed to boxy shapes that preceded it. We’ve seen the style elsewhere–Traverse–but it does not diminish the elegance in the shape, or perhaps the better detailing. The Pilot still balances its glass to metal superior to any rival, still stays far off the rough-and-tumble look of, say, a Durango. Inside, the Pilot is very well finished, that has a neatly organized cabin surrounded by numerous glass, from tall side windows with an available huge panoramic roof that floods the cabin in natural light.

With its 280-hp V-6, the Pilot pulls strongly be it paired that has a 6-speed or even a 9-speed automatic. Front-wheel drive is standard, all-wheel drive can be an option—as well as the Pilot can be outfitted that has a traction management system that will help it pull outside of mud pits or snow with ease. The Pilot will even tow as much as 5,000 pounds. Fuel economy has become rated in over the 20-mpg range; we’ve observed lower figures.

The Pilot’s plush ride and relaxed steering perform an expensive, mature feeling. The all-wheel-drive system has torque vectoring that lets it submit more sharply to corners, and therefore can seem to be at odds while using the softly sprung ride. You will be just as pleased with the firmer-riding front-drive version while using the standard 18-inch wheels and tires—as would we—but it’s only offered on the reduced trim levels.

Pilot comfort, safety, and features

Three rows of seats and space for up to eight passengers result in the Pilot Honda’s most versatile vehicle. Top seats are nearly ideally shaped, along with step-in height about a inch under before, the Pilot is a much better bet for smaller or older drivers. The middle row is adult-friendly, and in my ballet shoes, you will get a version with two captain’s chairs along with a pass-through. The seat reclines for very long trips and have their own tray table and cup holders.

In the trunk, the third-row seat is accessed by folding forward the second-row seat by pushing submit, a pleasant touch. Step-in room is slim, but the trunk seat has enough space for just two adults that has a surprising degree of head room and leg room. The seat is near to the floor so leg support isn’t great—but the belief that big people can sit by here is the Pilot the most useful people haulers around.

2017 Honda Pilot Open Doors

Cargo space is abundant in the Pilot. You will find cupholders everywhere, along with a console sufficient to have an iPad. Your third row folds down for just a flat cargo floor. You will find a reversible cargo panel for dirty things like soccer cleats and beach chairs—which cargo well behind another row hold an 82-quart cooler. Capri Sun for everybody!

Soft-touch surfaces and styling details which may have transformed this Pilot. It’s much, a lot more luxurious than before, even in base trims—it’s, the world thinks Elite versions compare very well against vehicles just like the Buick Enclave, even closely related Acura MDX.

Safety ratings are among the best while in the Pilot’s class—it’s earned a Top Safety Pick+ award from the IIHS, and five stars overall from the NHTSA. The Pilot offers blind-spot monitors, a LaneWatch camera with a diverse view along the right side of the car, a multi-rearview camera, and forward-collision warnings with automatic emergency braking.

Standard features include Bluetooth with audio streaming, touchscreen audio, power features, cruise control, and air conditioning. As you progress up in price, you can contribute satellite radio, leather trim, a DVD entertainment system, and heated and ventilated front seats.

Pricing for the 2017 Honda Pilot Price starts at $31,585 for the front-wheel-drive Pilot LX; the EX incorporates a base price of $33,930. On top of the lineup, the all-wheel-drive Pilot Elite with navigation has a base price of $47,970.

The 2017 Honda Pilot is actually a capable, refined crossover SUV with all the goodness on the minivan, save for the sliding doors.

The Honda Pilot was the primary big crossovers absolutely shun the existing SUV idiom. No blocky, bluff styling, no truck-like frame, no rugged low-ratio transfer case or knobby off-road tires. The very first Pilot had slim roof pillars, a cushy Civic-like cabin, and much much more seats.

That Pilot had been a success, and its particular follow-up act sold well, too, despite a bricklike body that experimented with ape its domestic kin, the Ford Explorer in particular.

The third-generation Pilot is included in the second year, and a flip time for Honda’s winning form.

Bought from LX, EX, EX-L, Touring, and Elite trims, the 2017 Honda Pilot only has made minor changes versus its complete redesign last year.

We provides it a 7.5 outside of 10, which makes it a highest-rated family vehicles.

Honda Pilot styling and

The Pilot’s soft corners and rounded fenders are usually more appealing compared to the boxy shapes that preceded it. We’ve seen the looks elsewhere–Traverse–but that will not diminish the elegance from the shape, or the better detailing. The Pilot still balances its glass to metal better than any rival, still stays far away from the rough-and-tumble look of, say, a Durango. Inside, the Pilot is very well finished, by using a neatly organized cabin encompassed by a great deal of glass, from tall side windows a great available huge panoramic roof that floods the cabin in natural light.

Featuring its 280-hp V-6, the Pilot pulls strongly whether it be paired by using a 6-speed or possibly a 9-speed automatic. Front-wheel drive is standard, all-wheel drive is definitely an option—and also the Pilot could be outfitted by using a traction management system that can help it pull outside of mud pits or snow with ease. The Pilot will tow as much as 5,000 pounds. Fuel economy continues to be rated in the low 20-mpg range; we’ve observed lower figures.

The Pilot’s plush ride and relaxed steering provides it a luxurious, mature feeling. The all-wheel-drive system has torque vectoring that lets it turn in more sharply to corners, which can seem to be at odds together with the softly sprung ride. You might be equally proud of the firmer-riding front-drive version together with the standard 18-inch wheels and tires—as would we—yet it is only offered on the cheaper trim levels.

Pilot comfort, safety, and features

Three rows of seats and space for up to eight passengers make Pilot Honda’s most versatile vehicle. Entry seats are practically ideally shaped, along with step-in height about a inch below before, the Pilot is a much better bet for smaller or older drivers. The very center row is adult-friendly, and initially, you may get a version with two captain’s chairs and a pass-through. The seat reclines for very long trips and has its own tray table and cup holders.

In the trunk, the third-row seat is accessed by folding forward the second-row seat by pushing submit, a pleasant touch. Step-in room is slim, but the trunk seat has enough space for two adults by using a surprising level of head room and leg room. The seat is near the floor so leg support isn’t great—but the point that big people can relax here helps to make the Pilot essentially the most useful people haulers around

2017 Honda Pilot Front Seats

 

Cargo space is abundant in the Pilot. You’ll find cupholders everywhere, and a console sufficient enough on an iPad. Your third row folds down to get a flat cargo floor. You will find there’s reversible cargo panel for dirty things like soccer cleats and beach chairs—this cargo well behind the 3rd row is capable of supporting an 82-quart cooler. Capri Sun for anyone!

Soft-touch surfaces and styling details that have transformed this Pilot. It’s much, considerably more luxurious than before, even just in base trims—so much so, the world thinks Elite versions compare very well against vehicles just like the Buick Enclave, even closely related Acura MDX.

Safety ratings are among the finest while in the Pilot’s class—it’s earned a Top Safety Pick+ award on the IIHS, and five stars overall on the NHTSA. The Pilot offers blind-spot monitors, a LaneWatch camera with a broad view down the right side of the car, a multi-rearview camera, and forward-collision warnings with automatic emergency braking.

Standard features include Bluetooth with audio streaming, touchscreen audio, power features, cruise control, and air conditioning. As you progress up in price, it’s fine to use satellite radio, leather trim, a DVD entertainment system, and heated and ventilated front seats.

Pricing for the Pilot starts at $31,585 for the front-wheel-drive Pilot LX; the EX incorporates a base price of $33,930. At the top of the lineup, the all-wheel-drive Pilot Elite with navigation has a base price of $47,970.

2017 Honda Pilot Comfort & Quality

The Pilot has probably the most useful interiors among crossovers; even adults can fit in the third-row seat.

With three rows of seats and room in them for just a full-grown adult, the Honda Pilot comes perilously close to maxing out space in a similar manner as Honda’s own Odyssey minivan. All it’s missing are those sliding side doors, really.

We provide a 9 beyond 10 for comfort and utility. Just a little Alcantara here, some knurled aluminum there, and it may well find the “exceptional” 10th point, but we are really not holding our breath.

From the numbers, the Pilot gains 1.7 inches of wheelbase, to 111.0 inches; it’s 3.5 inches more than the first sort version, at 191.0 inches long. However, the track is slimmer (from 67.7 to 66.3 inches), and height is likewise down 70.7 to 69.7 inches. The world wide web is one of the same interior volume, in accordance with Honda, with more room committed to frontal crash structure, third-row seating and cargo space.

2017 Honda Pilot Rear Seats

Depending on which Pilot you buy, you’ll either have a somewhat quiet driving knowledge of a good number of rich V-6 snarl—or a little less of it. Soft-touch trim is everywhere, correcting the major faux pas in the last-generation Pilot. There exists a finer awareness of detail everywhere—and on the EX-L trim level, an acoustic windshield blots out some noise. Touring and Elite models get acoustic glass on the leading doors, too, and tucked within them, the Pilot delivers a cabin where the leading and second-row passengers can discuss with ease.

Three rows of comfort

The Pilot does an admirable job delivering front-seat space and comfort. The seats are very bolstered, with good definition, even on the bottom trim levels (through EX-L). An increased driving position gives a commanding view away from the vehicle for smaller drivers.

The controls and storage all around the driver and front passenger are usefully placed and arranged. The rim has round controls to function the driver’s smartphone as well as the car’s audio system—positive thing, because the touchscreen is missing a knob for volume, entirely. A shallow bin while watching deep cupholders holds a Plus-sized smartphone right next with a high-power USB port. On 9-speed models, the possible lack of a shift lever gives a little better sensation of space from the cabin. A sliding lid covers the deep center console. Be warned: you can lose a smallish bag or phone in there.

Second-row seating comes in the form of a split-folding bench or a couple captain’s chairs on upper trims; between those buckets is walk-through access to the third-row seat, as well as a floor-mounted tray and set of cupholders. Also on upper trim levels (EX-L and above), we have a one-touch button that folds forward the second-row seats and slides them toward the leading of the car, checking better access to the third-row seat. Honda says there’s 1.5 inches more clamber-in room, and the earth sits 1.2 inches below what before.

It’s still a little slim on space, for adults to climb from the back—but when they’re back there, the Pilot provides amazing space for fullback-sized people. Head room and leg room are regarding the best were in, and set up seat cushion sits right on the floor, is still an unexpected so that you can fit large passengers in the 3rd row.

Storage area is commodious behind any row of seats. The space behind the 3rd row is 18.5 cubic feet, or about up to the back while on an Acura RLX. Behind the next row, there’s 55.9 cubic feet, and behind the leading row, 109 cubic feet of space—enough to maneuver over a half-dozen rubber tote bins but still leave an unobstructed view through a corner glass.

2017 Honda Pilot Safety

The Pilot’s good crash-test scores are accompanied by many leading safety features.

The Honda Pilot earned commendable marks from federal and independent testers, such as a five-star overall rating from government entities as well as a Top Safety Pick+ nod from IIHS testers.

We provide a 9 beyond 10, dependant on its crash tests as well as its pretty cheap safety options.

Every Pilot features a wide-angle rearview camera. About the EX, EX-L, and Touring models, a right-side-view camera offers looking along the vehicle about the dash display, activated by the right turn signal.

Honda also programs the Pilot to shift into Park should the driver’s seatbelt is unlatched, of course, if the motorist door is open.

Honda Sensing is on the market about the Pilot EX and Pilot EX-L. It offers adaptive cruise control; lane-departure and forward-collision warning systems with automatic emergency braking; active lane control; and road-departure mitigation, which uses sensors and cameras to ascertain should the Pilot is leaving the pavement, then tries to a car back on the highway with stability, braking, and steering inputs. The package comes standard on Pilot Touring and Pilot Elite trims.

About the Elite model, the LaneWatch camera is deleted in favor of blind-spot monitors with rear traffic alerts—a head unit we prefer because of its superior information and field-of-vision alerts (with LaneWatch, you will need to divert the eye area to your car’s display screen).

The NHTSA has published its data, as well as the 2017 Pilot retains its five-star overall ranking. That rating features a lower four-star score for frontal protection than we’d expect.

For 2017, the IIHS rated the Pilot with top “Good” scores on all crash tests, an “Acceptable” rating because of its headlights, as well as a “Superior” rating because of its front-crash avoidance technology, which netted a Top Safety Pick+ honor.

2017 Honda Pilot Features

The Pilot adds CarPlay and Android Auto to its ample standard features list this year.

The 2017 Honda Pilot’s seen a small price increase, but it really remains a great value in mid-level trims. We’d skip the beds base Pilot LX model, and choose among the midline EX, EX-L, or Touring trim levels. The Elite? It’s priced near Honda’s own Acura MDX, which deserves a glance for everybody who is attracted to spending almost $50,000.

2017 Honda Pilot Trunk

Pricing for that Pilot starts at $31,585 for that front-wheel-drive Pilot LX; the EX provides a base price of $33,930. Others in terms of the lineup, the all-wheel-drive Pilot Elite with navigation provides a base price of $47,970.

We perform an 8 out of 10 for features, with credit to its standard equipment, optional features, and new for 2017, incorporating Apple CarPlay and Android Auto.

Audio and infotainment

Honda’s audio and infotainment systems aren’t the ideal, but this year’s addition for the cleaner, easier Apple CarPlay and Android Auto interfaces should keep any driver happy and safe behind the wheel.

All Pilots buy a seven-speaker, 200-watt audio system accompanied by a 5.0-inch color touchscreen interface. The EX and EX-L trims buy a larger 8.0-inch display and the Android-based Display Audio interface, featuring its big tiles and icons and usually friendly operation. The Touring and Elite sport a 10-speaker, 540-watt premium audio system.

The Pilot’s SiriusXM audio system has some useful time-shifting capability. You can produce a custom channel that blends several stations into one, when buffers songs to ensure that repeat playback is possible. It may be able to come by alerts about the display for team scores and weather alerts.

Apple’s Siri Eyes Free can be included in the Pilot’s Display Head unit: just hold down the steering-wheel “talk” button and you’re able to ask Apple devices for a variety of information, utilizing the audio system as a conduit.

The Pilot’s navigation technique is Garmin-based, and includes live traffic reports, 3-D map views, and on-the-go rerouting.

The Pilot can get as much as five USB ports, four that will charge an iPad, and an HDMI port can pipe in content to a corner DVD entertainment system. Honda’s almost alone in sticking by these systems—it says the roof-mounted systems are certainly more easily viewed on the back two rows, thinking that the location contributes to less carsickness.

Standard and optional features

All Pilots, on the base LX on up, bring the same old power features; air con; cruise control; a 5.0-inch color audio display with AM/FM/USB port; cloth upholstery; and 17-inch wheels. Honda blocks some features from this model entirely, features perhaps forward-collision warning system and the one-touch second-row seat.

To the Pilot EX, you will find three-zone climate control; an electrical driver seat; a LaneWatch right-side camera; satellite radio; remote start; two more USB ports; and Pandora audio streaming and texting capability. The Honda Sensing safety package is a somewhat affordable option here. It provides forward-collision and lane-departure warning systems.

The Pilot EX-L sports leather; an electrical tailgate; an electrical moonroof; heated front seats; and the one-touch second-row seat. Pilot Touring crossovers adopt Honda Sensing safety gear as standard, and a Blu-ray DVD entertainment; a navigation system; 20-inch wheels; memory seats; parking sensors; two more USB ports, for an overall total of five; ambient lighting; stop/start; along with 115-volt outlet.

2017 Honda Pilot Back

On the more expensive Pilot Elite, you will find LED headlights; an additional panoramic roof panel over a corner seats; rear heated seats; front ventilated seats; a heated controls; automatic high beams; HD radio; and second-row captain’s chairs. You will also get Honda Sensing, but in this trim it drops the LaneWatch camera in favor of more conventional blind-spot monitors with rear cross-traffic alerts—a pc we prefer to its all-around accident prevention.

To the accessories list is a tent; a trailer hitch; black 20-inch wheels; rear parking sensors; a roof box; roof rails; bike mounts; and all-season floor mats.

2017 Honda Pilot Fuel Economy

The Pilot’s fuel consumption rate is average, but we’re seeing economy below what official ratings.

The 2017 Honda Pilot is rated because of the EPA at 19 mpg city, 27 highway, 22 combined. With all-wheel drive those numbers are roughly identical, just 1 mpg from highway.

We perform a 6 for fuel economy.

In ’09, with the creation of up to date Pilot, Honda promised boosts all the way to 2 mpg highway to its biggest crossover, as a consequence of upgraded transmissions with 6 and 9 forward speeds. Furthermore,it trimmed 300 pounds on the Pilot’s curb weight, and added stop/start, to save gas at traffic intersections. It is turned off, but it really resets itself to lets start work on every full power-up.

Touring and Elite models together with the 9-speed and front-wheel drive are with a rating of 20/27/23 mpg, adequate all-wheel drive, 19/26/22 mpg.

In the long-term test for the Honda Pilot, we’re seeing more along the lines of 19 mpg combined.

 

 

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